Texas Insights - October 2013

Volume IV, Issue 2
 

What’s New?

It has been almost 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in downtown Dallas, and plans have been made for a commemoration ceremony to take place this year. November 22, 1963, was a day that those who experienced it will never forget. It is an experience that many are willing to share. The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza and many other organizations are working together, and are offering a number of different events, with those who were there on that fateful day. 

The President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy, known as the Warren Commission, was established by President Lyndon B. Johnson on November 29, 1963. The Commission’s findings have been debated ever since they were released in September 1964. On October 11, 2013, an unprecedented panel of several members of the Warren Commission staff will meet at Southern Methodist University for, The Work of the Warren Commission, Half a Century On: Its Methods, Successes & Questions, to discuss their roles on the Commission and how the experience affected their professional lives. 

A public history event on October 12th, at the Sixth Floor Museum, features associated press photographer, Fred Kaufman, who was at the Fort Worth breakfast and Trade Mart luncheon on November 22, 1963. He also took one of the first photographs of Lee Harvey Oswald in custody and covered the Jack Ruby trial. Three days later, on October 15th, the museum will host authors, Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis. They will discuss and sign copies of their new book, Dallas 1963, which is an in-depth exploration of the swirling forces that lead many people to warn President Kennedy to avoid Dallas on his fateful trip to Texas. KERA and the Sixth Floor Museum, will present a public pre-screening of the first hour of JFK, a new American Experience documentary, on October 17th, at the Studio Movie Grille off of Central Expressway in Dallas. This will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A moderated by KERA’s Jeff Whittington.

Former KRLD journalists Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer and Wes Wise, will be joined by former KRLD photographer George Pheniz, on October 19th, for a book signing and to discuss memories of covering the Kennedy assassination in a new edition of their book, When the News Went Live: Dallas, 1963. Assassination eyewitness Tina Towner Pender will discuss and sign copies of her book, Tina Towner: My Story as the Youngest Photographer at the Kennedy Assassination, on October 26, 2013. Dick Stolley, Bob Sullivan, Jim Baker and Alexandra Zapruder will discuss and sign copies of their new book, LIFE The Day Kennedy Died: Fifty Years Later: LIFE Remembers the Man and the Moment, on October 26, 2013. The World Affairs Council welcomes, lecturer Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics, for The Kennedy Half Century, on October 28th, at Dallas City Performance Hall, with a second showing on October 31st, at the Angelika Film Center. Dr. Sabato explores the fascinating and powerful influence Kennedy has had over five decades on the media, the public, and his presidential successors. Meet Dr. Larry Sabato, on October 30th, as he signs his book, which inspired the film.

The Ochberg Society for Trama Journalism is hosting two events on November 1st. The first, Images that Shape History, will offer instght on why pictures have so much power to shape our understanding of tragedy. Panelists include Bob Jackson, formerly of the Dallas Times-Herald, who witnessed the killing of Lee Harvey Oswald and took Pulitzer Prize-winning photos of the events that day, and John Moore of Getty Images, an Irving native who photographed the assassination of Benazir Bhutto. The second event, Why Storytelling Matters, will discuss how stories have changed over the years, and features panelists, David Tarrant, of the Dallas Morning News, interviewing eyewitness Bob Miller, who was the paper’s city editor at the time, and remembers the “City of Hate” stigma; and the paper’s Dianne Solis talking to Albert Valtierra, a member of The Mexican American Historical League about the Viva Kennedy clubs.

After a half century, is Dallas’ catharsis complete or is it still in process? A daylong symposium, Understanding Tragedy: The impact of the JFK Assassination on Dallas, on November 2nd, will contemplate and attempt to measure the impact of JFK’s assassination from four perspectives: Journalism, Politics, Art and the Humanities, and Religion. Bill and Gail Newman were the closest civilian eyewitnesses to President Kennedy at the time of the fatal shot and were interviewed on TV immediately after the assassination. Their sons, Clayton and Bill, will join their parents on Saturday, November 9, 2013 to discuss their experience. On November 10th, join the Sixth Floor Museum for a screening of the PBS Documentary JFK: One PM Central Time. From the moment President Kennedy was shot until anchorman Walter Cronkite’s emotional pronouncement of his death at One PM Central Standard Time, this documentary tells the riveting story of the reporting from Dallas and the CBS Newsroom in New York. The film features rarely seen archives of President John F. Kennedy, Walter Cronkite, and moving memories from the producers, writers, and reporters who were there on that day. The film is narrated by George Clooney and features an interview with President Bill Clinton.

On November 14th, at the AT&T Performing Arts Center, there will be a screening of the film, Letters to Jackie, by Academy Award-winning director Bill Couturie. He shares the legacy of a fallen president and captures the grief of a nation through letters sent to Jackie Kennedy in the days and months following the assassination. The letters are voiced by award-winning actors including Anne Hathaway, Octavia Spencer, Frances McDormand, Allison Janney, Channing Tatum, and others. Join authors, Clint Hill and Lisa McCubbin as they sign their new book, Five Days in November, on November 23, 2013. Pan Am stewardess, Kari-Mette Pigmans, will speak on December 6th and again on December 7th, 2013. She was aboard the White House press plane in the early 1960s and had met President Kennedy several times. She was at Dallas Love Field at the time of the assassination.

The Sixth Floor Museum and their partner organizations are looking forward to all the events, to commorate the life and death of President John F. Kennedy. More events will be announced over the next few months. To stay up-to-date, visit the Sixth Floor Museum website, or TeachingTexas.org.

 It has been almost 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in downtown Dallas, and plans have been made for a commemoration ceremony to take place this year.  November 22, 1963, was a day that those who experienced it will never forget.  It is an experience that many are willing to share.  The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza and many other organizations are working together, and are offering a number of different events, with those who were there on that fateful day. The President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy, known as the Warren Commission, was established by President Lyndon B. Johnson on November 29, 1963.The Commission’s findings have been debated ever since they were released in September 1964.  On October 11, 2013, an unprecedented panel of several members of the Warren Commission staff will meet at Southern Methodist University for, The Work of the Warren Commission, Half a Century On: Its Methods, Successes & Questions, to discuss their roles on the Commission and how the experience affected their professional lives. A living history event on October 12th, at the Sixth Floor Museum, features associated press photographer, Fred Kaufman, who was at the Fort Worth breakfast and Trade Mart luncheon on November 22, 1963.  He also took one of the first photographs of Lee Harvey Oswald in custody and covered the Jack Ruby trial. Three days later, on October 15th, the museum will host authors, Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis.  They will discuss and sign copies of their new book, Dallas 1963, which is an in-depth exploration of the swirling forces that lead many people to warn President Kennedy to avoid Dallas on his fateful trip to Texas.KERA and the Sixth Floor Museum, will present a public pre-screening of the first hour of JFK, a new American Experience documentary, on October 17th, at the Studio Movie Grille off of Central Expressway in Dallas.   This will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A moderated by KERA’s Jeff WhittingFormer KRLD journalists Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer and Wes Wise, will be joined by former KRLD photographer George Pheniz, on October 19th, for a book signing and to discuss memories of covering the Kennedy assassination in a new edition of their book, When the News Went Live: Dallas, 1963.  Assassination eyewitness Tina Towner Pender will discuss and sign copies of her book, Tina Towner: My Story as the Youngest Photographer at the Kennedy Assassination, on October 26, 2013.  Dick Stolley, Bob Sullivan, Jim Baker and Alexandra Zapruder will discuss and sign copies of their new book, LIFE The Day Kennedy Died: Fifty Years Later: LIFE Remembers the Man and the Moment, on October 26, 2013.The World Affairs Council welcomes, lecturer Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics,  for The Kennedy Half Century, on October 28th, at Dallas City Performance Hall, with a second showing on October 31st, at the Angelika Film Center.   Dr. Sabato explores the fascinating and powerful influence Kennedy has had over five decades on the media, the public, and his presidential successors.   Meet Dr. Larry Sabato, on October 30th, as he signs his book, which inspired the film.The Ochberg Society for Trama Journalism is hosting two events on November 1st.  The first, Images that Shape History, will offer instght on why pictures have so much power to shape our understanding of tragedy.  Panelists include Bob Jackson, formerly of the Dallas Times-Herald, who witnessed the killing of Lee Harvey Oswald and took Pulitzer Prize-winning photos of the events that day, and John Moore of Getty Images, an Irving native who photographed the assassination of Benazir Bhutto.  The second event, Why Storytelling Matters, will discuss how stories have changed over the years, and features panelists, David Tarrant, of the Dallas Morning News, interviewing eyewitness Bob Miller, who was the paper’s city editor at the time, and remembers the “City of Hate” stigma; and the paper’s Dianne Solis talking to Albert Valtierra, a member of The Mexican American Historical League about the Viva Kennedy clubs.After a half century, is Dallas’ catharsis complete or is it still in process? A daylong symposium, Understanding Tragedy: The impact of the JFK Assassination on Dallas, on November 2nd, will contemplate and attempt to measure the impact of JFK’s assassination from four perspectives: Journalism, Politics, Art and the Humanities, and Religion. Bill and Gail Newman were the closest civilian eyewitnesses to President Kennedy at the time of the fatal shot and were interviewed on TV immediately after the assassination.  Their sons, Clayton and Bill, will join their parents on Saturday, November 9, 2013 to discuss their experience.  On November 10th, join the Sixth Floor Museum for a screening of the PBS Documentary JFK: One PM Central Time.  From the moment President Kennedy was shot until anchorman Walter Cronkite’s emotional pronouncement of his death at One PM Central Standard Time, this documentary tells the riveting story of the reporting from Dallas and the CBS Newsroom in New York. The film features rarely seen archives of President John F. Kennedy, Walter Cronkite, and moving memories from the producers, writers, and reporters who were there on that day. The film is narrated by George Clooney and features an interview with President Bill ClOn November 14th, at the AT&T Performing Arts Center, there will be a screening of the film, Letters to Jackie, by Academy Award-winning director Bill Couturie.  He shares the legacy of a fallen president and captures the grief of a nation through letters sent to Jackie Kennedy in the days and months following the assassination.  The letters are voiced by award-winning actors including Anne Hathaway, Octavia Spencer, Frances McDormand, Allison Janney, Channing Tatum, and others.Join authors, Clint Hill and Lisa McCubbin as they sign their new book, Five Days in November, on November 23, 2013.  Pan Am stewardess, Kari-Mette Pigmans, will speak on December 6th and again on December 7th, 2013.  She was aboard the White House press plane in the early 1960s and had met President Kennedy several times.  She was at Dallas Love Field at the time of the assassination.

Humanities Texas Workshop

 VisHumanities Texas is proud to present, Texas before Statehood, an educator workshop to be held on October 18th, 2013 in Dallas.  Teachers will hear presentations by Jesus de la Teja, Juliana Barr, Raul A. Ramos, Andrew J. Torget, and Randolph B. Campbell. Teachers must apply to participate, and space is limited.  First priority will be given to teachers who are new to teaching or are in low performing school districts.  For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.orgHumanities Texas is proud to present, Texas before Statehood, an educator workshop to be held on October 18th, 2013 in Dallas. Teachers will hear presentations by Jesus de la Teja, Juliana Barr, Raul A. Ramos, Andrew J. Torget, and Randolph B. Campbell. Teachers must apply to participate, and space is limited. First priority will be given to teachers who are new to teaching or are in low performing school districts. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

Energizing Texas History Conference

The Region 10 Education Service Center and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the Energizing Texas History Conference, November 7-8, 2013 at the Old Red Museum in Dallas. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1836 to the turn of the century. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.The Region 10 Education Service Center and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the Energizing Texas History Conference, November 7-8, 2013 at the Old Red Museum in Dallas. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1836 to the turn of the century. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
The Region 10 Education Service Center and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the Energizing Texas History Conference, November 7-8, 2013 at the Old Red Museum in Dallas. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1836 to the turn of the century. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
 Visit

Featured Institution

Texas State Cemetery
A Walk through Texas history

                 “Kids can come out here and in one day learn more about Texas history than in a
                  whole semester in class.”  Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock
 
Lt. Governor Bullock’s statement has always resonated and been the educational standard the Research Department has always strived to achieve. The goal at the Cemetery is to educate Texans about the historical relevance and significance of the individuals buried there. Individuals include Stephen F. Austin, Albert Sidney Johnston, John Connally, and Barbara Jordan.

The education/interpretation program is the most important outreach program they utilize. Through this program they are able to link the people who are buried there with their meaning to the entire history of Texas. Most states are not like Texas, we are proud of our history and the pride is shown by the State of Texas mandating schools teach Texas history to our 4th and 7th graders. It’s important to demonstrate how Texas has played a role in our nation’s history and helped shaped the world as well. 

When Texans and Texas schoolchildren visit the Cemetery they can take a group tour or explore the grounds by themselves. They have self-guided audio tours, brochures, and even a video detailing the history of the Cemetery. The audio tours and brochures provide the visitor with a unique experience of “Walking through Texas history.” Walking and exploring the grounds is a great way to connect with the people buried there and understand the roles they played in shaping our history and culture.

By far most of their visitors are the 15,000 Texas schoolchildren, mostly 4th and 7th graders, who visit annually. The tours are geared towards the 4th and 7th grade Texas history curriculum. Before a school visits, they encourage the teachers and students to explore their website to familiarize themselves with the Cemetery. In addition, teachers are supplied with a guidebook, which includes various activities to share with their students to facilitate their understanding of the Cemetery and the people buried there.

History does not make itself, people make history. The central theme of the Museum/Gallery exhibit is to act as a prologue to a walking tour of the grounds, and to bring meaning to the history of Texas for today’s 4th and 7th grade students and other Texas history enthusiasts.

Their mission is to provide permanent exhibits, interactive lesson plans, and learning tools to convey the history of Texas through the lives and accomplishments of the individuals buried at the Texas State Cemetery. The exhibit focuses on important aspects of Texas History:  Colonization, Texas Independence, Republic of Texas, Statehood & Confederacy, and 20th Century. Finally, the exhibit provides an overview of the history of the Cemetery and the changes, which have been made throughout the years.

Since the renovation and reorganization of the Texas State Cemetery in 1997, the Cemetery has gone through tremendous changes aesthetically. In addition, the overall mission of the Cemetery changed to preserve and to protect the historical and cultural significance through educational and interpretive programs. The benefits to the Cemetery have been immeasurable and will continue to be a major portion of their overall mission.

Historian's Corner

The Regulator-Moderator War
By Bill O'Neal
State Historian of Texas

Texas was the site of more blood feuds than any other state or territory. The first Texas blood feud was the Regulator-Moderator War in 1840-1844. Regulator and Moderator designations and extralegal conflicts traced back to the American colonies of the 1760s and 1770s, during the turmoil preceding and during the Revolution. Pioneer settlers brought the tradition of Regulator and Moderator violence to the backwoods of East Texas.

Thirty-one men were killed in Harrison and Shelby counties during the Regulator-Moderator War. Although sometimes known as the “Shelby War,” violence began late in 1840 in Harrison County. Regulator George W. Rembert was killed in a shootout with Moderators, and Isaac Hughes was slain by a sheriff’s posse of Moderators. Sheriff John B. Campbell soon was killed by the brother of Hughes, and later in the year further retribution was attained through the shooting deaths of two more Moderators. On March 2, 1842, Senator Robert Potter of the Texas Republic was killed during a Regulator attack on his family home on the east side of Caddo Lake. Although a controversial figure, Potter served as Secretary of the Navy during the Texas Revolution, and he signed the Declaration of Independence – six years to the day before he was killed by Regulators.

In 1843 Peter Whetstone, who had donated the town site for Marshall, was shot dead in town by a diehard Regulator. And on a Sunday in 1844, former Harrison County District Judge John M. Hansford and his wife returned from church services to their rural home, where a waiting Regulator posse shot him to death in his yard. Only eight of the men slain in the Regulator-Moderator War were from Harrison County, but four were the most prominent victims of the conflict: Senator Potter, Sheriff Campbell, Judge Hansford, and Peter Whetstone, founder of Marshall.

The first man killed in Shelby County was Joseph Goodbread, a “land pirate” (counterfeiter of land titles). Charles W. Jackson, a former steamboat captain, shot Goodbread in the heart in Shelbyville, the log cabin village that served as county seat of lawless Shelby County. Captain Jackson organized a company of Regulators and went after lawbreakers, flogging a horse thief and burning the cabins of two sets of brothers. These aggrieved parties formed a Moderator company, to “moderate” the roughshod activities of the Regulators.

The first act of “moderation” was to assassinate Captain Jackson, who was blown out of his saddle – along with a luckless companion – on a wilderness road in Shelby County. “Colonel” Watt Moorman, a young, hard-drinking, hot-tempered killer, assumed command of Shelby County Regulators. Within a year seven of the eight assassins of Captain Jackson had been tracked down and shot or hanged. The only assassin who was spared was fourteen-year-old Bailey McFadden, released by a Shelbyville mob because of his age. The angry mob of 300 voted 174-0 (women and children were not permitted to vote) to hang Bailey’s older brothers, John and “Buckskin Bill” McFadden.

By this point Col. Watt Moorman controlled Shelbyville and a great deal of Shelby County with 100 Regulator riders. Moorman’s chief antagonist, John Bradley, left his Shelby County home for the presumed safety of San Augustine. But Moorman boldly slipped into San Augustine at night and blasted Bradley with a shotgun as he emerged from a church service.

Shelby County Moderators rallied under Jeff Cravens, a Shelbyville attorney and deputy sheriff who was elected colonel. Colonel Cravens led fifty Moderators into Shelbyville and seized the town. Colonel Moorman sent a plea to Harrison County for reinforcements, and Captain William Boulware – the man who had killed Peter Whetstone - marched from Marshall with close to 100 Regulators. Two of Whetstone’s sons were among the Moderators who reinforced Col. Jeff Cravens, who soon commanded over 100 men.

No other Texas feud ever would see such large forces facing each other as the Regulators and Moderators of 1844. There were three skirmishes in Shelby County, and Moorman and Cravens maneuvered for a climactic battle. Their strategy was interrupted by President Sam Houston, serving his second term as chief executive of Texas. For years the government had received petitions pleading for a halt to the violence. The Republic of Texas was deep in debt, and among many economies, President Houston did not maintain a standing army. But there was a loose militia, and President Houston called for volunteers to assemble in San Augustine. By the time Houston and Thomas J. Rusk, Major General of Militia, arrived in San Augustine, 600 volunteers were in town. Aided by veteran officers, Houston promptly organized the volunteers and sent them marching north into Shelby County. The Regulators and Moderators melted into the woods, and the leaders of both factions were taken to Houston. The President issued harsh warnings to Moorman and Cravens then stationed a company of cavalry in Shelbyville for several months.

Retribution is a hallmark of blood feuds and in 1850 Watt Moorman was shot gunned as he stepped off a river ferry. Far more tragic was the infamous “Poison Wedding.” In 1847, just three years after the Regulator-Moderator War ended, a wedding took place between Regulator families. But a vicious Moderator partisan poisoned the wedding cake, and eight to ten guests died. If these victims are added to the casualty list, as many as forty people died as a result of the war. The Regulators and Moderators established a murderous standard for the later blood feudists of Texas.

Featured Lesson

The Regulator Moderator War in Shelby County was one of the bloodiest feuds in Texas history.  To help teach this event to your students, use Shelby County: The Regulator Moderator War, from The Portal to Texas History. This lesson plan, with versions for both 4th and 7th grade, includes background information, a power point with a wealth of primary source material, student worksheets, and links to additional primary sources and related information. This lesson plan is sure to catch the attention of your students and provide an exciting learning opportunity. 

Texas History News

Several opportunities for Texas history educators and students are available or are on the near horizon:

 The Texas State Historical Association is accepting nominations for the Mary Jon and J.P. Bryan Leadership in Education Award. This annual award is to recognize and honor an outstanding history teacher in Texas. This award is open to any teacher who teaches history in Texas. The winner is presented with a cash award of $5,000. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org. Nomination deadline is December 14, 2013
Join the University of North Texas Department of History for the Teaching of History Conference (TCON). This event will be held on October 5, 2013 on the University of North Texas campus. Historical presenters include: Richard McCaslin, Katherine Jellison, Aaron Navarro, Denise Joseph, Edward Countryman, John Garrigus, Michael Gillette, Nicholas Salvatore, and Michael Leggiere. Teachers will earn CPE hours for attending. Visit TeachingTexas.org for more information.
Join the University of North Texas Department of History for the Teaching of History Conference (TCON). This event will be held on October 5, 2013 on the University of North Texas campus. Historical presenters include: Richard McCaslin, Katherine Jellison, Aaron Navarro, Denise Joseph, Edward Countryman, John Garrigus, Michael Gillette, Nicholas Salvatore, and Michael Leggiere. Teachers will earn CPE hours for attending. Visit TeachingTexas.org for more information.
Join the University of North Texas Department of History for the Teaching of History Conference (TCON). This event will be held on October 5, 2013 on the University of North Texas campus. Historical presenters include: Richard McCaslin, Katherine Jellison, Aaron Navarro, Denise Joseph, Edward Countryman, John Garrigus, Michael Gillette, Nicholas Salvatore, and Michael Leggiere. Teachers will earn CPE hours for attending. Visit TeachingTexas.org for more information.

 

 Humanities Texas is accepting nominations for the Linden Heck Howell Outstanding Teaching of Texas History Award. This award is open to any teacher who teaches a Texas History course. The winner is presented with a $5000 cash award and an additional $500 for their school to purchase instructional materials. Nomination deadline is December 12, 2012. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
Harlingen CISD and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the South Texas History Workshop, October 12, 2013 in Harlingen. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1682 to the present. Presenters include scholars Bill O'Neal, Denise Joseph, Jerry Thompson, and Albert Davila, along with other Texas social studies organizations. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
Harlingen CISD and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the South Texas History Workshop, October 12, 2013 in Harlingen. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1682 to the present. Presenters include scholars Bill O'Neal, Denise Joseph, Jerry Thompson, and Albert Davila, along with other Texas social studies organizations. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
Harlingen CISD and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the South Texas History Workshop, October 12, 2013 in Harlingen. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1682 to the present. Presenters include scholars Bill O'Neal, Denise Joseph, Richard McCaslin, and Albert Davila, along with other Texas social studies organizations. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration, visit TeachingTexas.org.

   Join the University of North Texas Department of History for the Teaching of History Conference (TCON). This event will be held on October 5, 2013 on the University of North Texas campus. Historical presenters include: Richard McCaslin, Katherine Jellison, Aaron Navarro, Denise Joseph, Edward Countryman, John Garrigus, Michael Gillette, Nicholas Salvatore, and Michael Leggiere. Teachers will earn CPE hours for attending. Visit TeachingTexas.org for more information.The Texas State Historical Association is accepting nominations for the Mary Jon and J.P. Bryan Leadership in Education Award. This annual award is to recognize and honor an outstanding history teacher in Texas. This award is open to any secondary or higher education educator who teaches history in Texas. The winner is presented with a cash award of $5,000. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

 Harlingen CISD and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the South Texas History Workshop, October 12, 2013 in Harlingen. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1682 to the present. Presenters include scholars Bill O'Neal, Denise Joseph, Jerry Thompson, and Albert Davila, along with other Texas social studies organizations. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.Humanities Texas is accepting nominations for the Linden Heck Howell Outstanding Teaching of Texas History Award. This award is open to any teacher who teaches a Texas History course. The winner is presented with a $5000 cash award and an additional $500 for their school to purchase instructional materials. Nomination deadline is December 12, 2012. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

For the first time in decades, some of Fort Travis Seashore Park’s Historic Bunker and Battery will be open for tours during the Jane Long Festival, courtesy of the Galveston County Parks Service which has been making exciting changes to this unique park. Hosted by the Bolivar Peninsula Cultural Foundation, on October 12th, the festival will include local art, craft and food booths, expanded parking, a children’s pavilion to include games, face painting, and snow cones, a silent auction, local artists, and live entertainment, including western shootouts and music. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

 The San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site, and the San Felipe United Methodist Church will team up to present the 2013 Father of Texas Celebration on Saturday, November 2, 2013.  Participants will be given the opportunity to enjoy a wide variety of activities such as a hands-on activities related to archeology, colonial printing, historic surveying, the land office, colonial games, and two screenings of recent documentaries – Spanish Texas and A Nation’s Capital: Houston – both produced by Houston Arts and Media. Visit TeachingTexas.org for additional information.

The Star of the Republic Museum would like to invite you to see the historic site of Washington as it looked in 1836, using their new app, Texas 1836, for iphone, ipad, and newer android phones.  Washington-on-the-Brazos, the birthplace of Texas, was a crucible of Texas democracy, the place where Texans gave voice to their grievances, forged their Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and brought forth a new nation: the Republic of Texas. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
 
 

Houston Arts and Media are proud to present the Houston History Book Fair and Symposium.  Hosted by the Houston Metropolitan Reserach Center, the Houston Public Library, and Story Sloane's Gallery, this event will take place at the Historic Julia Ideson Building on November 9, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Activities will include meeting the authors of many publications, door prizes, speakers, dozens of local history books will be available for purchase. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

The Region 13 Education Service Center and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the Discovering Texas History Conference, January 23-24, 2014 at the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin. This workshop, for 4th and 7th grade Texas history teachers will focus on Texas history from 1900 to the present. Teachers will earn either CPE or GT credit hours. For more information and registration information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
 
  Step back in time with the Brazoria County Historical Museum as it presents the Ninth Annual Austin Town, November 1-2, 2013. A living history re-enactment, Austin Town recalls and celebrates the lives of those pioneers who settled Colonial Texas from 1821-1832. Set just north of Angleton, the fictitious Austin Town features character interpreters, demonstrators, sutlers, militia drill units, and period games. See TeachingTexas.org for more information.
 
Join the San Antonio Living History Association as they present battle re-enactments and historic demonstrations.  The first, the Battle of Conception re-enactment will occur at Alamo Plaza, October 26th. Members of the association will participate in a commemorative ceremony and historic encampment with period demonstrations of life during the Texas Revolution. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.    

To make space for the arrival of the 2014-2015 Texas Almanac, the Texas State Historical Association is offering a special classroom teacher opportunity while supplies last. Teachers and school librarians can receive a class set, 36 copies, of the 2012-2013 Texas Almanac for only $50.00, the cost of shipping! Supplies are limited, and will be distributed on a first come basis. Visit the TSHA website for additional information.

The Texas State Historical Association is proud to announce the release of a new book in the Fred Rider Cotten Series.  Matamoros and the Texas Revoluation by Craig H. Roell, tells the forgoten importance of the strategic, Mexican port city of Matamoros. Roell provides a refreshing reinterpretation of the confict in Texas from a Mexican point of view. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

 

The San Antonio Living History Association would like you to join them for The Battle of Bejar re-enactment, will be held on December 7th. Participants will re-enact the storming of San Antonio de Bejar, by Texian and Tejano volunteers who laid siege and drove out the Mexican garrison from the town of Bejar and the Alamo fortress in December 1835. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

Texas Insights is a publication of the Texas State Historical Association
in cooperation with the University of North Texas.

Texas State Historical Association
1155 Union Circle #311580
Denton, TX 76203-5017

Stephen Cure - Editor
JoNeita Kelly - Associate Editor

 

Bookmark and Share