Texas Insights - January 2015

 

Volume V, Issue 3
 

What’s New?

The Texas State Historical Association is proud to announce that the Texas Almanac Teacher’s Guide has been updated, with changes and additional graphics which will benefit both teachers and students. Each lesson provided has been re-edited and many activity sheets and guides have been added, which can be printed for student use. Bolder topography enables teachers to easily scan lessons to search for the right activity when teaching on one of the many topics covered in the Almanac. The addition of more photographs and graphics will appeal to students, and colorful mini-posters for many of the lessons have been created. 
 
The core set of 46 regular lessons were designed to be used with all sections of the Texas Almanac, and 16 special lessons were created for feature articles unique to each Almanac from 2006-2007 through the current 2014-2015 edition. All lessons list the TEKS and STAAR standards that they fulfill. A link if provided for teachers to request an answer key geared for the last three editions of the Almanac. The Texas Almanac 
Teacher’s Guide lessons and appendix tools can be downloaded on the Texas Almanac Website.
 
For a limited time, the Texas State Historical Association has made the 2014-2015 edition of the Texas Almanac available to download for free. This includes the entire 752 page, full color book in digital form, an article by Texana writer Mike Cox titled, “Sketches of Eight Historic Ranches of Texas,” over 250 state and county maps including a pronunciation guide to Texas town and county names, Coverage of the 2012 elections and redistricting, weather highlights of the previous two years, a list of destructive weather dating from 1766, the 2012 Texas Olympic medalists, and the article, “The REAL Friday Night Lights,” which is a complete reference for Texas High School and College sports. To download your free copy of the Texas Almanac visit the TSHA Website. 
 

Encountering Texas History Conference

The Region 4 Education Service Center and the Texas State Historical Association are proud to present the Encountering Texas History Conference at the Region 4 Education Service Center. This event, for 4th and 7th Grade Texas history educators, will focus on the history of Texas from 1900 to present day. Teachers will be able to choose from a variety of breakout sessions addressing historical content, geography, economics, civics, teaching strategies, and resources. Scheduled presentations by notable scholars and organizations, including: The State Historian, Bill O’Neal, Mari Nicholson Preuss, J’Nell Pate, William McWhorter, Louis Fairchild, Bernadette Pruitt, Debra Winegarten, Law-Related Education, NASA, Texas Council on Economic Education, First Day Covers, The Portal to Texas History, Houston Arts and Media, Abigail Press, Texas Archive of the Moving Image, Texas Historical Commission, Sam Houston Project, Teachers Curriculum Institute, Dinah-Might Adventures, Texas General Land Office, and many more. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

 

Enduring Spirit Exhibit

The Star of the Republic Museum invites the public to visit and view their upcoming special exhibit. Enduring Spirit: African Americans in 19th Century Texas, will open February 1, 2015 and run through February 15, 2016. This exhibit will describe the challenges African Americans faced in Texas in the 19th century. While the first African Americans in Texas were free men and women seeking opportunity and advancement, the laws of the newly-formed Republic of Texas forced them out and opened the door to thousands of enslaved people who served as the backbone of the labor force for almost 30 years. Finally gaining their freedom after the Civil War, they discovered their struggle was far from over. Artifacts on display will include slave records, freedmen contracts and an oath of allegiance. Stoneware pottery made at Wilson Pottery near Seguin, the first African American business in Texas will be exhibited as well as an example of the intricate Pine Burr pattern quilt. For additional informaiton on how to view this exciting new exhibit, visit TeachingTexas.org. 

 

Featured Institution

Houston Area Digital Archives
By Jeanette Sewell
Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, Houston Public Library

“I get from the soil and spirit of Texas the feeling that I, as an individual, can accomplish whatever I want to, and that there are no limits, that you can just keep going, just keep soaring. I like that spirit.”            –Barbara Jordan
 
The Houston Area Digital Archives was established to provide open, online access to the rich collections of the Houston Public Library and other community archives. Our goal is to preserve archival resources by providing digital access and to promote the discovery and use of our unique special collections by making them freely available for research and study. Much of the archival material that is digitized is housed at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center. Its collections include approximately 4 million photographs, 150,000 architectural drawings, and numerous rare books and maps. Digitized material also includes historical film clips, an extensive collection of oral histories, sheet music, scrapbooks, and other ephemera.
 
Since 2012 the Houston Public Library has partnered with the Houston Metropolitan Research Center to create an Educator and Student Resources page as part of the Houston Area Digital Archives website. Inspired by Barbara Jordan and other important historical figures, we wanted to rise to the challenge of transforming our existing digital archival materials to make them more useful and exciting for students and teachers. Our goal continues to be to encourage students to connect the events of history to their lives today.
 
The Educator and Student Resources page features a link to our materials on the Teaching Texas website. The Houston Area Digital Archives adds materials to Teaching Texas on an ongoing basis that are most applicable to Texas and Houston history. Materials that have been added include:
 
  • The oldest known photograph of Houston, dated 1856.
  • Historical documents from the early days of Texas, including a promissory note from Santa Anna.
  • Photographs of notable Houstonians such as Oveta Culp Hobby and Lydia Mendoza.
  • Books digitized at the Internet Archive that are relevant to Texas history topics.
  • Materials related to significant landmarks such as the Houston Astrodome and the San Jacinto Monument.
  • Timelines that make history come alive through an interactive visual narrative.
  • Featured Collections pages that provide access to a wide variety of materials on HADA including photographs, oral histories, and archival finding aids. 
  • A guide to Houston Public Library online resources that includes links to databases, e-books and other educational websites.

The Student Historian Internship Program (SHIP) was also established in 2013 to give area high school students ages 16 and up the opportunity to gain real world job experience working in an archive. The interns learn about all the types of jobs done at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center and create various work products using material from the Houston Area Digital Archives.

In 2014, the Houston Area Digital Archives completed the metadata for two extensive archival collections: the John J. Herrera Papers and the Mexican American Family and Photo Collection. These materials were scanned by the University of North Texas and are accessible through both the Portal to Texas History and the Digital Public Library of America. Both collections represent the rich and 
fascinating narratives of Hispanic and Latino Americans in Houston and are a significant contribution to local history.
 
Currently, the Houston Area Digital Archives is engaged in two exciting grant projects made possible by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission: Mapping Houston’s History and Astrodome Memories. Mapping Houston’s History will result in a GIS map and website of 1,000 geocoded points that are historically significant to Houston’s history. Interactive map layers and online exhibitions created with the software, Omeka, will bring the stories to life. Astrodome Memories is a cooperative grant with the Houston Public Library, Harris County Archives, Harris County Public Library, the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections, and the Woodson Research Center at Rice University. This project will provide broad access to Astrodome related materials available at each institution including memorabilia, oral histories, photographs and more. A contribution from the Houston Area Digital Archives will include online access to the Astrodome Memory Wall panels, currently housed at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center. Visitors to the Dome Mobile, a mobile project by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, lent their signatures and messages of support to preserve the Houston Astrodome.
 
Explore the Houston Area Digital Archives. Recent additions are available by clicking on the individual collections in the red Browse All Collections box on the home page.

Have you ever gone to a museum and wanted to touch the artifacts or costumes?   Or for those who are still a kid at heart, wanted to talk with the costumed manikins?  On a more serious note, have you ever asked yourself, “What is my connection to this place?”  At Texas Parks and Wildlife, all of these experiences are possible.   The Buffalo Soldier Heritage and Outreach Program (BSOHP) is an educational outreach program in State Parks that features costumed interpreters, interactive exhibits, and offers participants unique cultural and historical experiences.
      Primarily focused on the African American military experience in Texas, BSHOP also features the life and times of Tejanos, Native Americans, and Frontier Women.  Targeting ethnic minorities and urban populations, the program’s goal is to create connections for audiences unfamiliar with State Parks and Historic Sites, as well as offer new historical insights. The story of the Buffalo Soldiers, the first African American men to serve in the regular Army in the late 19th Century, is an excellent example of an important part of Texas History seldom elaborated in traditional textbooks. By sharing these stories, TPWD opens doors into communities that once questioned their stake in Parks. 
      BSHOP has three component programs to accomplish this task.  First is the educational outreach program, Texas Buffalo Soldiers.  This program brings the museum to the audience and features authentic military camps, uniforms, horses, and even firing demonstrations.  This unique vehicle provides BSHOP the opportunity to bring interactive programming to audiences ranging from traditional classrooms to State Parks.
      The second program component is the Blazing New Trails program. In addition to lack of being stakeholders, studies have found that urban and some ethnic minorities also shy away due to lack of outdoor experience.  Blazing New Trails partners with multiple entities, such as the National Buffalo Soldier Museum, to offer these audiences the opportunity to experience State Parks and Historic sites with a minimal investment of their time or monetary resources.  For many participants, this represents the first time they have ever camped, cooked over an open fire, or even played baseball.
      Finally, for those looking for expert advice about the Buffalo Soldiers and other Texas History components, the program offers research assistance.  Exploring Texas Roots is the program’s research component. Tasked originally with identifying African American Heritage sites, this program now also provides support to educators and community groups who desire to share these stories as well.
      If interested in learning more about the Buffalo Soldiers and all the other voices of Texas History, please feel free to pay a visit to the following events:
March
2-3 “Life’s Better Outside: Houston Live Stock Show and Rodeo” Houston
23-24 “McKavett Western Heritage Days” Fort McKavett State Historic Site
April
27-28 “Life’s Better Outside: Buccaneer Day’s” Corpus Christie
May
3-5 “Buffalo Soldier Education Day and Open House” Lake Brownwood State Park
18-19 “Buffalo Soldier and Frontier Education Day” Lake Arrowhead State Park
August
11 “Buffalo Soldier and Texas State Parks Heritage Expo” Old Settlers Park, Round Rock Have you ever gone to a museum and wanted to touch the artifacts or costumes?   Or for those who are still a kid at heart, wanted to talk with the costumed manikins?  On a more serious note, have you ever asked yourself, “What is my connection to this place?”  At Texas Parks and Wildlife, all of these experiences are possible.   The Buffalo Soldier Heritage and Outreach Program (BSOHP) is an educational outreach program in State Parks that features costumed interpreters, interactive exhibits, and offers participants unique cultural and historical experiences.
      Primarily focused on the African American military experience in Texas, BSHOP also features the life and times of Tejanos, Native Americans, and Frontier Women.  Targeting ethnic minorities and urban populations, the program’s goal is to create connections for audiences unfamiliar with State Parks and Historic Sites, as well as offer new historical insights. The story of the Buffalo Soldiers, the first African American men to serve in the regular Army in the late 19th Century, is an excellent example of an important part of Texas History seldom elaborated in traditional textbooks. By sharing these stories, TPWD opens doors into communities that once questioned their stake in Parks. 
      BSHOP has three component programs to accomplish this task.  First is the educational outreach program, Texas Buffalo Soldiers.  This program brings the museum to the audience and features authentic military camps, uniforms, horses, and even firing demonstrations.  This unique vehicle provides BSHOP the opportunity to bring interactive programming to audiences ranging from traditional classrooms to State Parks.
      The second program component is the Blazing New Trails program. In addition to lack of being stakeholders, studies have found that urban and some ethnic minorities also shy away due to lack of outdoor experience.  Blazing New Trails partners with multiple entities, such as the National Buffalo Soldier Museum, to offer these audiences the opportunity to experience State Parks and Historic sites with a minimal investment of their time or monetary resources.  For many participants, this represents the first time they have ever camped, cooked over an open fire, or even played baseball.
      Finally, for those looking for expert advice about the Buffalo Soldiers and other Texas History components, the program offers research assistance.  Exploring Texas Roots is the program’s research component. Tasked originally with identifying African American Heritage sites, this program now also provides support to educators and community groups who desire to share these stories as well.
      If interested in learning more about the Buffalo Soldiers and all the other voices of Texas History, please feel free to pay a visit to the following events:
March
2-3 “Life’s Better Outside: Houston Live Stock Show and Rodeo” Houston
23-24 “McKavett Western Heritage Days” Fort McKavett State Historic Site
April
27-28 “Life’s Better Outside: Buccaneer Day’s” Corpus Christie
May
3-5 “Buffalo Soldier Education Day and Open House” Lake Brownwood State Park
18-19 “Buffalo Soldier and Frontier Education Day” Lake Arrowhead State Park
August
11 “Buffalo Soldier and Texas State Parks Heritage Expo” Old Settlers Park, Round Rock Have you ever gone to a museum and wanted to touch the artifacts or costumes?   Or for those who are still a kid at heart, wanted to talk with the costumed manikins?  On a more serious note, have you ever asked yourself, “What is my connection to this place?”  At Texas Parks and Wildlife, all of these experiences are possible.   The Buffalo Soldier Heritage and Outreach Program (BSOHP) is an educational outreach program in State Parks that features costumed interpreters, interactive exhibits, and offers participants unique cultural and historical experiences.
      Primarily focused on the African American military experience in Texas, BSHOP also features the life and times of Tejanos, Native Americans, and Frontier Women.  Targeting ethnic minorities and urban populations, the program’s goal is to create connections for audiences unfamiliar with State Parks and Historic Sites, as well as offer new historical insights. The story of the Buffalo Soldiers, the first African American men to serve in the regular Army in the late 19th Century, is an excellent example of an important part of Texas History seldom elaborated in traditional textbooks. By sharing these stories, TPWD opens doors into communities that once questioned their stake in Parks. 
      BSHOP has three component programs to accomplish this task.  First is the educational outreach program, Texas Buffalo Soldiers.  This program brings the museum to the audience and features authentic military camps, uniforms, horses, and even firing demonstrations.  This unique vehicle provides BSHOP the opportunity to bring interactive programming to audiences ranging from traditional classrooms to State Parks.
      The second program component is the Blazing New Trails program. In addition to lack of being stakeholders, studies have found that urban and some ethnic minorities also shy away due to lack of outdoor experience.  Blazing New Trails partners with multiple entities, such as the National Buffalo Soldier Museum, to offer these audiences the opportunity to experience State Parks and Historic sites with a minimal investment of their time or monetary resources.  For many participants, this represents the first time they have ever camped, cooked over an open fire, or even played baseball.
      Finally, for those looking for expert advice about the Buffalo Soldiers and other Texas History components, the program offers research assistance.  Exploring Texas Roots is the program’s research component. Tasked originally with identifying African American Heritage sites, this program now also provides support to educators and community groups who desire to share these stories as well.
      If interested in learning more about the Buffalo Soldiers and all the other voices of Texas History, please feel free to pay a visit to the following events:
March
2-3 “Life’s Better Outside: Houston Live Stock Show and Rodeo” Houston
23-24 “McKavett Western Heritage Days” Fort McKavett State Historic Site
April
27-28 “Life’s Better Outside: Buccaneer Day’s” Corpus Christie
May
3-5 “Buffalo Soldier Education Day and Open House” Lake Brownwood State Park
18-19 “Buffalo Soldier and Frontier Education Day” Lake Arrowhead State Park
August
11 “Buffalo Soldier and Texas State Parks Heritage Expo” Old Settlers Park, Round Rock  Have you ever gone to a museum and wanted to touch the artifacts or costumes?   Or for those who are still a kid at heart, wanted to talk with the costumed manikins?  On a more serious note, have you ever asked yourself, “What is my connection to this place?”  At Texas Parks and Wildlife, all of these experiences are possible.   The Buffalo Soldier Heritage and Outreach Program (BSOHP) is an educational outreach program in State Parks that features costumed interpreters, interactive exhibits, and offers participants unique cultural and historical experiences.
      Primarily focused on the African American military experience in Texas, BSHOP also features the life and times of Tejanos, Native Americans, and Frontier Women.  Targeting ethnic minorities and urban populations, the program’s goal is to create connections for audiences unfamiliar with State Parks and Historic Sites, as well as offer new historical insights. The story of the Buffalo Soldiers, the first African American men to serve in the regular Army in the late 19th Century, is an excellent example of an important part of Texas History seldom elaborated in traditional textbooks. By sharing these stories, TPWD opens doors into communities that once questioned their stake in Parks. 
      BSHOP has three component programs to accomplish this task.  First is the educational outreach program, Texas Buffalo Soldiers.  This program brings the museum to the audience and features authentic military camps, uniforms, horses, and even firing demonstrations.  This unique vehicle provides BSHOP the opportunity to bring interactive programming to audiences ranging from traditional classrooms to State Parks.
      The second program component is the Blazing New Trails program. In addition to lack of being stakeholders, studies have found that urban and some ethnic minorities also shy away due to lack of outdoor experience.  Blazing New Trails partners with multiple entities, such as the National Buffalo Soldier Museum, to offer these audiences the opportunity to experience State Parks and Historic sites with a minimal investment of their time or monetary resources.  For many participants, this represents the first time they have ever camped, cooked over an open fire, or even played baseball.
      Finally, for those looking for expert advice about the Buffalo Soldiers and other Texas History components, the program offers research assistance.  Exploring Texas Roots is the program’s research component. Tasked originally with identifying African American Heritage sites, this program now also provides support to educators and community groups who desire to share these stories as well.
      If interested in learning more about the Buffalo Soldiers and all the other voices of Texas History, please feel free to pay a visit to the following events:
March
2-3 “Life’s Better Outside: Houston Live Stock Show and Rodeo” Houston
23-24 “McKavett Western Heritage Days” Fort McKavett State Historic Site
April
27-28 “Life’s Better Outside: Buccaneer Day’s” Corpus Christie
May
3-5 “Buffalo Soldier Education Day and Open House” Lake Brownwood State Park
18-19 “Buffalo Soldier and Frontier Education Day” Lake Arrowhead State Park
August
11 “Buffalo Soldier and Texas State Parks Heritage Expo” Old Settlers Park, Roun

Historian's Corner

Making Connections with History
 
By Donald Frazier
McMurry University

While growing up in Texas, history surrounded me. My dad, Bruce Frazier, was a typical West Texas raconteur, had a story about every town, hill, landscape, oil field, and cotton gin we passed on our frequent road trips. This “windshield history” served to pass the time as we drove the miles and miles of miles and miles across the state. Mostly, the tales involved cattlemen, Indians, Spanish explorers, or wildcatters, but occasionally a yarn about World War II or chasing Poncho Villa might sneak in. My mom, on the other hand, contributed the part of the family saga dealing with the American Civil War. This part of history, though, seemed awfully remote from West Texas.
 
Even so, it was the Louis Marx and Company “playsets” that truly captured my imagination—back when history provided enough action heroes to keep the networks and Hollywood happy. These toys, sold in the 1950s and 1960s and cross-marketed with popular television shows, featured such exciting offerings as Fort Apache, The Alamo, and the Blue and the Gray. Being the youngest of ten kids, I often raided my older brother’s cache of plastic soldiers to spin my own history scenarios. Still, though, the Civil War seemed remote—Virginia was where that conflict occurred, correct? Then, when I was eleven, we moved to Macon, Georgia.
 
Here, I discovered that the Civil War was close, live, and present. I also discovered acres of dead Confederates in the Rose Hill Cemetery on the banks of the Ocmulgee River near downtown.  Among the fallen were thirteen Texans. This piqued my interest. Even if the Civil War hadn’t come to Texas in a major way, its men had certainly found the war. I thought, at that tender age, that I knew all about the Civil War. Here, though, was evidence of a much larger story about which I had no idea! What else did I not know about?
 
Dad encouraged me to research the lives of these dead Texans. They had their names, ranks, and regiments on their headstones. He taught me how to contact the state archives and ask for relevant service records based on this information. In those pre-email and internet days, I waited awhile before I received long triplicate forms that smelled of carbon paper and mimeograph and asked all kinds of questions about pensions, regiments, and locations. Eventually, I received photocopies of what service records existed for these dead men. Most were very incomplete. One, though, stood out: Jonathan B. Craig, Company E, 15th Texas Cavalry. This Tennessean turned East Texan had finally been swept into the ranks early in 1862, fought throughout the campaigns of that regiment, but finally received a wound that proved mortal in August 1864.
 
The problem for me, as an elementary and middle school researcher, was that his service took him to places I had never heard of, even in passing. Arkansas Post and Searcy?  Camp Douglas and City Point? Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost Gap, Dalton?  At least there was one battle, Chickamauga, which sounded familiar. Who was Hiram Granbury? Who was Patrick Cleburne? Why were their towns in Texas named for them? I exhausted the resources of the library at Springdale Elementary fairly quickly, but I did manage to grab a copy of the American Heritage’s The Civil War at the book fair.  It was my first scholarly purchase.
 
This soldier became my muse, his story my meme for years after my family’s return to Texas during my junior high years. Craig had enlisted in Mansfield, Texas, and we had moved to Arlington. Once again, our lives intersected. After high school, college, and stints in the newspaper business, television sports, and the defense industry, history called me back into its service, particularly to answer the question I first posed in Macon, Georgia.  What did Texas do during the Civil War? I graduated from Texas Christian University in 1992, and then joined the professoriate at McMurry University in Abilene. Throughout this journey, though, I remembered how having this personal, intimate knowledge of how a huge event—the Civil War—made distant times and places seem more real, more relevant. I wanted my students to take this journey as well.
 
I learned during my odyssey that Texas had a pretty impressive, but underreported Civil War story. It sent tens of thousands off to distant battlefields, armies and navies fought battles on its soil and along its coastal waters, and ordinary citizens had to cope with extraordinary times that saw 200,000 enslaved Texans become free. Then, the whole South seemed to move to Texas.  “GTT” became the sign for folks cashing out someplace farther east and trying a new start in Texas. This post-Civil War story became just as fascinating.
 
I used this phenomenon, of the war coming to Texas after the fighting had ended, to launch my pedagogical technique. I would have my students go to the oldest cemetery they could find in their hometown, or in Abilene and surrounding communities, to find the grave of a former Civil War soldier that some thoughtful member of a heritage organization had marked or some family member had memorialized. The students came back, amazed, that such men slumbered eternally just a short way from campus. Then, as my dad had taught me years ago, I had them research these dead veterans’ lives and service before, during, and after the Civil War.
 
The more diligent among my neophytes took to the project. They, too, discovered a past so much larger than they imagined. The emergence of online resources including Ancestry, Fold 3, and the Soldiers and Sailors database of the National Park Service of course made the experience richer, more nuanced, and more complete than it had ever been while I was in school—and much, much, faster. Remarkably, though, I forgot to apply these new techniques to Jonathan B. Craig.
 
After years in the classroom, and sharing this anecdote with generations of students and Civil War enthusiasts across the country, my original muse paid me a visit. One evening, in a post lecture conversation, a researcher informed me that, according to the records now available online, that Private Craig of the 15th Texas Cavalry had lived in Carthage, Texas, at the outbreak of the war, but had moved with his young wife and two little girls to Tarrant County, possibly to avoid getting mixed up in the affair. After the Confederacy passed near-universal conscription, Craig left his home and family to serve. He did so amid many a deadly trial, until a sweltering summer day in 1864 when Federal cavalry overran the Texan picket line near Jonesboro, Georgia, in an area now just off the end of the runway at Hartsfield International Airport. Craig, hit in the leg in this barely noticed affair, was evacuated to the hospital in nearby Atlanta.
 
That scene in Gone with the Wind with all the wounded Rebels lay waiting to be evacuated while Scarlett O’Hara looked on in horror? Craig would have been among them. I did not know at the time, but do now, that the trains they waited for took them to Macon, Georgia. Craig did not long survive the journey. The citizens of that town, spared up to that point the complete horrors of war, saw to it that these dead and dying men imported by rail would at least lay in marked graves when their time came.
 
When he left Texas, Craig could not have known that his life—he was only in his late 20s—would end on the banks of the Ocmulgee River, far from his home and his little girls. Neither could I, as an eleven-year-old, know that my life as a historian and educator would begin near that very spot some 112 years after he drew his last breath.

 

Featured Lesson

As you begin to plan your lesson on Texas in the Civil War, make sure to check out the lesson plan, Researching Local Civil War Soldiers from the Civil War Trust. While completing this lesson, students will access and complete an analysis of primary sources such as census records, maps, photographs, visiting local historic cemeteries, and other Civil War related documents. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org. 
 

Texas History News

Several opportunities for Texas history educators and students are available or are on the near horizon:

The Museum of South Texas History invites the community to celebrate this year’s Pioneer & Ranching Crafts Day on February 15, 2015. This annual Rio Grande Valley tradition is included in the fee for regular museum admission, and features artisans, hands-on activities, music and dance performances. Visitors will enjoy a highly interactive and entertaining event while learning about South Texas traditions and foods. For more information visit TeachingTexas.org.

 

 
GISetc and Bishop Dunne Catholic School are proud to introduce the 27th annual GeoTech conference, February 26- 28, 2015. This event allows teachers to explore the most cutting edge technologies available in education today. Industry and classroom leaders offer hands on workshops on using the latest tools in education to enhance curriculum and stimulate the imagination. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

Live the History! The San Jacinto Museum of History Association would like to invite you to participate in the annual San Jacinto Day Festival and Battle Reenactment, on April 21, 2012. This year’s event marks the 176th Anniversary of Texas Independence and record attendance is anticipated! More than 20,000 visitors joined us at the San Jacinto Monument for the Festival in 2011. Highlights of the Festival include family entertainment, living history demonstrations, a children’s area and vendors reflecting all things Texas. In the late afternoon, the largest battle reenactment in the state celebrates the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.  
Live the History! The San Jacinto Museum of History Association would like to invite you to participate in the annual San Jacinto Day Festival and Battle Reenactment, on April 21, 2012. This year’s event marks the 176th Anniversary of Texas Independence and record attendance is anticipated! More than 20,000 visitors joined us at the San Jacinto Monument for the Festival in 2011. Highlights of the Festival include family entertainment, living history demonstrations, a children’s area and vendors reflecting all things Texas. In the late afternoon, the largest battle reenactment in the state celebrates the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.   Live the History! The San Jacinto Museum of History Association would like to invite you to participate in the annual San Jacinto Day Festival and Battle Reenactment, on April 21, 2012. This year’s event marks the 176th Anniversary of Texas Independence and record attendance is anticipated! More than 20,000 visitors joined us at the San Jacinto Monument for the Festival in 2011. Highlights of the Festival include family entertainment, living history demonstrations, a children’s area and vendors reflecting all things Texas. In the late afternoon, the largest battle reenactment in the state celebrates the 1836 Battle of San Jacinto. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.    
 

Join the Institute of Texan Cultures for their upcoming, free, Oral History Workshop. This event will take place on February 10, 2015 and will provide resources and guidance on how to access and use oral histories in the classroom and how to effectively conduct a student-produced oral history project. This event is free, but you must register to attend. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org. 

 

 

Introducing a new book series all about the Adventures of Arnie Armadillo. Learn about Texas regions as Arnie Armadillo visits various locations in Texas, while at the same time meeting important historic Texas heroes, such as: Sam Houston, Jose Antonio Navarro, David Crockett, Juan Sequin, and many more. To learn more about this wonderful book series, visit TeachingTexas.org. 

 

The Fort McKavett State Historic Site and the Texas Historical Commission invites the public to celebrate history at the annual West Texas Heritage Days, March 28, 2015. Throughout the day, activities include cavalry, artillery and infantry action drills, Native American living history performances, Buffalo Soldiers, Buffalo Hunters, chuck wagon foods, the Texas Camel Corps and frontier skills demonstrations. A band playing period music will perform during a barbecue lunch offered by the Friends of Fort McKavett. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org.

    

 

Texas Beyond History would like to invite you to view their newest online exhibit, Life after Slavery: Investigation of an African American Farmstead. Through archeology, archival records, and oral history, the Ransom and Sarah Williams farmstead project has revealed the story of one African American family’s transition from slavery to freedom. In a larger sense it represents thousands of other African American families whose stories cannot be told. This exhibit includes primary and secondary sources along with lesson plans. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org. 
 
Join the Texas State Historical Association at its Annual Meeting in Corpus Christi. The program is now available for the 119th Annual Meeting of the Texas State Historical Association. Make plans to attend, March 5-7, 2015 at the Omni Corpus Christi Hotel. The meeting presents an opportunity for 45 sessions on Texas history, exhibitors of both new and rare books, a silent auction, and a live auction hosted by Heritage Auctions. Teachers are able to register to attend all three days of the meeting for only $25.00 per person. Teachers can earn CPE hours, each day, including a special session just for educators. More information is available on TeachingTexas.org.
 
 
The Texas State Historical Association is happy to announce that the Texas Quiz Show is back and better than ever! After the program’s digital makeover, the changes are dramatic. Now the program has moved online with a series of digital quizzes available for students in 4th -8th grade, where students compete as individuals in a series of progressively more difficult online quizzes. Posted in March, these quizzes align with Texas History Month, and the 36 students with the highest scores will be invited to Austin to compete to see who knows Texas best. Several practice quizzes have been launched, so students and teachers can test out the new format. For more information, visit TeachingTexas.org. 
 

The Public Education Initiative would like to invite you to view their newest lesson plan, Cultural Populations of Texas. This lesson utilizes standards in multiple strands, such as religious freedom, frontier expansion, cattle, oil, railroad industries, and civil rights; to explore the impact made to and on Texas by multiple unique racial, ethnic, and religious immigrant groups. Visit TeachingTexas.org for more information.  

   
 
The Texas Historical Commission is proud to introduce two new lesson plans. The first, Texas Historical Markers, introduces students to the importance of understanding and preserving local history. The second, Prisoner of War Camps in Texas, will introduce the idea that Texas was the site of various POW camps throughout World War II. Both lessons are sure to spark student interest in the Texas history classroom.
TeachingTexas.org would like to welcome, new partner, the Institute of Texan Cultures. Located in HemisFair Park in San Antonio, and only a short walk from The Alamo and the River walk, this museum is a popular tourist’s destination. Visitors will learn the stories and cultural heritage of immigrants from around the globe who settled in Texas. For more information, visit the partner’s page on TeachingTexas.org.
 
TeachingTexas.org would like to welcome, new partner, the SMU Central University Libraries. Located on the Southern Methodist University campus, the digital collections include the Southwest, Mexico, the Civil War, and World War II. Specialized holdings include Texas art, photography, and currency notes, Civil War and World War II photography, and Mexican photography and imprints. For more information, visit the partner’s page on TeachingTexas.org
 
The Texas State Historical Associaion has partnered with the Smithsonian Instiution to host Journey Stories.  This traveling exhibit will be in Victoria from January 12-February 8, 2015, then will move on to Edinburg, February 16-March 29, 2015. Student generated websites will be incorporated into the exhibit while it is in Texas. Visit TeachingTexas.org, for additional information. 
 
The Texas Archive of the Moving Image is proud to announce the release of their newest lesson plan, Understanding and Using Primary and Secondary Sources. This lesson will help students to understand the importance of varied, accurate primary and secondary sources when conducting research to support valid arguments. Lesson plans are available for K-5, 6-8, 9-12, and post-secondary levels. For additional information, visit TeachingTexas.org.
 

Texas Insights is a publication of the Texas State Historical Association
in cooperation with the University of North Texas.

Texas State Historical Association
1155 Union Circle #311580
Denton, TX 76203-5017

Stephen Cure - Editor
JoNeita Kelly - Associate Editor

 

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